FIRST IMPRESSION FRIDAY: e.l.f. Duo Eyebrow Kit

Hello, frenz and happy FriYAY!!! If you read my last post, you would know that I am changing up my blog. What I've come to decide is that I like makeup and that's what I want to write about. I apologize for all the confusion that has come with the change up, but makeup is something I love and it's something I want to pursue. I hope you all stick around to read my new content! As you can tell by the title, today is First Impression Friday, so let's jump right into this, shall we?

Let's talk about brows. Brows shape your face and they can either make or break your look. I've been fussing with my brows for YEARS and have just recently learned what works well for me and what doesn't. Now for the record, I don't have one set brow product. I use Maybelline's Nude eye shadow palette for my brows. Go ahead and judge me. The only brow product I've found that I truly love is the Anasatasia Beverly Hills Brow Wiz, but I went through it super quick and I lack the bread to repurchase. So since then, I've been experimenting with different brow products, as well as shadows, to give me the perfect brow.

So today, I'm going to talk about a very popular brow product, E.LF.'s Duo Eyebrow Kit.image3
This product has been in my collection since about this time last year. I've wanted to try it forever, but could never find the blonde shade that I needed. I once tried the dark shades and I immediately regretted that decision and it turned me off to the product for some time. But alas, my local Wal-Mart had the blonde shade in stock and I purchased it for a measly $3…only to let it sit in my collection. Yesterday, I stumbled upon it and thought to give it a go.

This product is a duo, with a pigmented wax and a powder. The wax is a darker shade than the powder. It has more of a red undertone, whereas the powder is more ashy, with a cooler undertone. It comes in a tiny compact with a mirror attached to the inside top of the lid. Also included is a mini double-ended applicator; one side being an angled brush and the other being a small blending brush.image2
I chose not to use the applicator that came with it and, instead, reached for my E.L.F. angled brush, mainly because it has a longer handle and it's what I always use to fill in my brows.

By just looking at the pigmented wax, you wouldn't think it would be any different from their darker shades, but upon swatching, you can see that it is a much lighter brown, almost like a dirty natural blonde.image1 (2)

When applying the wax, it goes on very smooth and was more pigmented than I had anticipated. It worked well and filled in the part of my brows that were fuller, but the formula's consistency made it hard to fill in the sparse parts of my brows. It has a rather oily consistency and smudged easily. Wiping away the edges of my brow with my finger smudged the ends entirely. I couldn't really reach the product into the arch of my brow where I needed more coverage. I tried going in with the powder portion and it did a decent job at mattfying the wax, but was no good at giving my arch coverage.

Once I got the outer part of my brows filled in as much as I could, I started working on the inner part. My brows have been over-plucked for years (currently trying to grow them back), so I hardly have any hair on the inner brow, and the hair that I do have is a very light blonde. Again, the consistency gave me trouble on giving the illusion that I had full brows in the front. Even when applying the wax and blending it out, you could see the distinct space between where my eyebrow started and the "illusion" begins. It was nearly impossible to make hairlike strokes with the wax, leaving my brows blocky and thick. Again, going in with the powder only helped to mattify the wax, but didn't give me the coverage and illusion I desired. I ended up just coating my brows in the wax the best that I could, and then put the powder over it to try to make them appear less oily.

I wore this product for a good eight to ten hours before taking it off. It did a fairly good job at keeping my brows in place where I had hair, but as the day went on, you could see the sparseness of product in the inner part of my brow. It seemed like the mattifying effect that the powder gave completely wore off as the day went on and as my skin became more oily. If you would've seen me, you wouldn't have thought that I was a beauty blogger or that I had any clue what I was doing with a brow product. Looking in the mirror at the end of the day, my brows looked sparse, discolored and oily.

I really wanted this product to work out. E.L.F. is one of my favorite drugstore lines. They're inexpensive, cruelty-free and most of their products work fantastically for me. This duo eyebrow kit, however, was a complete bust…but I'm not giving up hope.

I want to try it again with the powder I currently use to fill in my brows and see if that makes much of a difference. I really want to like this product and find a way to make it work. Perhaps if you have fuller brows, this would work better for you. Like I said previously, the consistency didn't allow me to create the illusion of thick and full brows where my hair was more sparse. I wanted to take pictures of the inconsistency in color, but unfortunately, it wasn't showing up on camera…but it was a disaster in person.

Let me know in the comments if this product works for you and if you have any recommendations of how to make it work — I would LOVE to hear them. I hope you all have a fantastic weekend!rl

 

Is Social Media a Popularity Contest?

CONTEST.png

Ah, social media, the time waster and meme maker. The internet and social media are incredible technologies. We can create content, whether it be a video, writing, artwork, whatever you’re into — we create it and we’re able to share it with anyone in any part of the world at any time. There are thousands, if not millions, of creators trying hard to be noticed on social media, through the vast sea of like-minded internet peers. We want our content to be seen and heard by everyone. It’s almost like high school, trying to be noticed by the cute senior with the car. It’s a popularity contest based solely off of follows and likes from total strangers.

Between Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat and other social media platforms, there are millions of people trying to get noticed; either by a company, record label or just likes on a picture. When did numbers begin to validate our existences? I remember a time when I would delete pictures off of Instagram or Facebook if they didn’t get “enough” likes. I was so wrapped up in the validation of perfect strangers that I lost track of who I was in real life. I was trying to portray a version of myself on the internet; a person that someone would like — and for what? Follows and likes. Since coming out of the “it’s all about numbers” phase, I’ve been able to be one of the more honest folks on the internet. I stopped caring about the numbers because it doesn’t define me or my content. If they like me, they’ll follow me. If not, oh well.

Recently, I’ve become increasingly aware of creators who have, let’s say, 14k Twitter followers, but complain that they only have 40 blog or video views. It’s not about having a great number of followers; it’s about having an audience, people who like what you create and genuinely want to read/listen. I can’t figure out why so many creators take so much time to gain unengaging and, ultimately, fake followers, when they could be producing a potential groundbreaking masterpiece. Not everyone is going to like what you produce, just like you may not like what someone else produces. We all have our likes and dislikes, and you can’t be upset when someone doesn’t necessarily like what you create. For example, I’m not going to follow a blog that has a niche in childcare when I don’t have kids. My follow won’t matter if I’m not reading and engaging with the creator.

We need to stop getting caught up in false validation and get back to creating unique and incredible content. As a creator, I enjoy writing. It gives me a creative way to get my thoughts out of my head and onto a virtual notepad. I started a blog because I wanted to share my thoughts and my seemingly different opinions. I wanted to have a voice in this world and maybe even make a difference. I want readers to relate to my thoughts, and maybe take something away from my experiences to better themselves. I put hard work into my posts. I do the research when necessary. I revise the same sentence and paragraph a million times before I’m satisfied with the way it sounds. I get joy out of creating my little space on the internet.

“I like to do it. If someone doesn’t like it, they don’t have to read it.”

Social media can be a gift to creators who really want to make something out of their passions. It’s no longer a popularity contest when you care less about the numbers and more about the real-life person behind that follow or like button.

To all of my readers and followers, thank you for reading. You all mean the world to me and you make my little space on the internet radiate with light. I wish you all the very best.

rl

[Photo Credit: Pixabay]